Food

Sawubona! Welcome!

From Boerewors to Bunny Chow - South African cuisine is as unique and eclectic as its culture. Like the US, South Africa is a melting pot of people, languages, traditions and food. Malaysian, Dutch, and Indian influences can be seen in many of the traditional dishes of South Africa. 
Eating at the SA fest is kind of like going to a restaurant that happens to be outdoors and is only open 2 days a year.  There’s a menu and each item is priced differently.  When possible, meats are local, farm raised and grass fed.  Most veg and fruit are also from local farms.  The Boerewors sausage is hand-made.  In a nutshell - this is NOT your typical festival food.  Some items are subject to change, as our chefs need the flexibility to use the freshest, best local produce and meat at festival time.
 
You’ll have the opportunity to see most of the dishes as you stand in line - if you have any questions, ask one of our servers.  Don’t forget the sauce!  Whether you’re eating chicken, lamb, boerewors or samoosas - its just not the same without the sauce. Spice it up with some Peri Peri or add some tang with Train Smash.  Sauces are available along the line and again at check out.
 
Tables and chairs are available under the seating tent.  Many people prefer to bring lawn chairs or picnic blankets and eat by the pond where the dancers and musicians perform. the 2013 Menu has not yet been set - to get an idea of what to expect - take a look at last year’s menu:
 
 
2012 Menu:
 
Mains and Sides
Spit Roasted Lamb
Fish & Chips with Malt Vinegar
Grilled Chicken Peri-Peri
Boerewors sausage on a roll
Mixed Grille  - Lamb, Chicken & Boerewors
Samoosas -(aka samosa) Spiced potato & veg filled pie with choice of sauce
Bobotie Spring Rolls (see description below)                                      
Slap Chips (Fries) with malt vinegar
Yellow rice with apricot, almonds and green pepper       
Biltong and Droewors  (Visit our Biltong Page for Details!)
 
Sauces
Braai BBQ Sauce
Train Smash
Monkey Gland Sauce
Chutneys
 
Sweets
Mango gelato with Peri Peri
Amarula gelato
Lychee gelato
Zebra gelato w/ choc and vanilla
 
More Info On South African Cuisine
 
One of the main staple foods in South Africa is maize.  In their corn-on-the-cob form they are called mielies (a.k.a. mealie) Mielie pap (made from ground white corn meal) is a popular side dish and is often eaten with stews, gravies or sauces like Train Smash (stewed tomato & onion.)  Samp (aka stampmielies or stamp) is similar to posole or dried hominy, roughly ground. Samp is found in dishes like Umngqusho, where it is cooked with cow peas (a variety of black-eyed-peas.)

Pumpkin, yams, sweet potatoes, aubergine, and rice are also common foods in South Africa.  Americans traveling to South Africa for the first time will find exotic dished made with familiar ingredients (good examples would be bobotie, biltong and boerewors;) variations on common staples (such as the textural difference between mielie pap and American grits or spoon bread;) and of course foods & spices that are either rare, rarely eaten, or non-existent in the United States, such as fresh lychee fruit, amarula fruit, sour figs, pumpkin leaves, snoek (a fish,) fresh calamari steak, Kudu (antelope,) ostrich, oxtail, African bird’s eye chili, etc., etc.  Following are a few popular dishes in South Africa.:

Bobotie - pronounced “bo-bo-tee” The name comes from the Indonesian word Bobotok. Its a savory ground meat dish with a savory egg topping.  A typical bobotie recipe contains ground beef, curry, almonds and apricot.  The mixture is baked, with whisked eggs/milk added to the top towards the end of the baking process.  Bobotie is sometimes referred to as South African meat loaf.  Our twist on this traditional dish is to wrap slices of the prepared bobotie in spring roll wrappers and deep fry them.. they are amazing!  Try them dipped in chutney and you’ll find youself going back for seconds.
Boerewors - pronounced “bor-eh-vors” A traditional South African sausage spiced with coriander.  Boerewors is usually mild but can be spiced up with condiments and sauces such as chutney, peri peri sauce or train smash.   Boerewors is a must-have for any braai (barbeque.)
Biltong - pronounced “bill-tong” Dried meat flavored with coriander and other spices. Unlike American jerky, biltong is sliced across the grain and can also be found in uncut portions and sticks.
Potjiekos - pronounced poy-kee-kos. A potjie is a three legged cast iron pot used to cook stews over a fire or hot coals. Potjiekos is a stew made in a potjie. There are hundreds of secret family recipes for this dish - most of them containing meat such as ox tail or beef.
Prawns Peri Peri - A.K.A. Prawns Piri Piri, A.K.A Prawns Pili Pili, Prawns Mozambique, LM Prawns.  This dish is popular in coastal regions of Africa and has become a mainstay at South African restaurants and back-yard braais.  Large tiger or king prawns are marinated in Peri Peri chilis. garlic, lime juice and olive oil and grilled to perfection.  The prawns are served in the traditional way, with shell, tail and head intact.
Slap Chips - These are large french fries - often served in paper bags or wrapped in paper.  “Slap” is an Afrikaans word meaning soft - the state the french fry attains when you douse it with vinegar - thus rendering it a slap chip, not a french fry.
Rice Salad - there are many variations of this popular salad, some served cold, some hot.  Many contain curry, fruit such as mango or raisins, nuts and carrots.

Grayhaven Winery/SA Food & Wine Fest:  (804) 556-3917

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